Skip to main content

About your Search

20090801
20090831
STATION
WETA 28
WMPT (PBS) 21
LANGUAGE
English 49
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)
the u.s. economy lost 371,000 jobs last month. to keep up with population growth, economists figure the u.s. needs to create 130,000 jobs a month. in a recovery, the u.s. should create something like 300,000 to 400,000 a month, enough to begin reducing unemployment significantly. that means the country won't recover the jobs lost to this recession until somewhere around the year 2014 at the earliest. economist dean baker says it won't be easy to replace the jobs lost because the recession has slammed housing and auto manufacturing, two sectors that usually drive the recovery in hiring. >> in the case of residential construction, we have enormous over-capacity. it's very difficult to imagine any significant increase in employment in that sector for years to come. in the case of autos, we can see increased demand, we probably will see increased demand, but a lot of that demand is going to be for foreign cars right now. >> reporter: of course, the economy will eventually create enough jobs to make up for those lost in the great recession. but those jobs may also be in different industr
are perking up. we look at whether that rising tide will help lift the u.s. economy. >> susie: prospects for recovery are definitely lifting oil prices. crude continued its march higher on hopes a recovery will bring with it a big boost in demand. >> paul: "cash for clunkers" heads to history's scrap heap but dealers are getting a little extra time to cross their "t's" and dot their "i's". so what's next for the u.s. auto industry? coming up, some answers from a noted analyst. >> susie: this recruiter is trying to fill 300 positions but he's swamped with thousands of resumes. tonight, standing out in a crowded field of applicants. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> susie: and i'm susie gharib. this is nightly business report for monday, august 24. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> susie: good evening everyone. oil prices closed at a new high for the year: $74.37 a barrel. in new york trading october crude futures rose 48 cents to settle just shy of $75. prices have doubled sinc
in the u.s. surpassing credit card transactions for the first time ever. but as stephanie dhue reports, for consumers, the trend has its pluses and minuses. >> reporter: josh clark is among the increasing number of americans who are choosing debit over credit. he made the switch three months ago, after maxing out his credit card while starting a designer jean business. >> i realized if i put something on my credit card, i'm going to be paying interest on it until i can fully repay it. >> reporter: tight credit is also encouraging more debit card use. and consumers are using it to manage their money. clark says it helps him control spending. >> i check my bank account more frequently than i check my credit card account, so i'm more in tune with how much money i have to spend. >> reporter: as debit card use surpasses credit cards that presents new challenges for both consumers and regulators. debit cards come with fewer built-in protections. consumer advocate ed mierzwinski warns in the case of a lost or stolen card number, the debit card holder can be on the hook for much more than if a
captioning sponsored by wpbt >> paul: u.s. stocks take it on the chin with the dow posting its biggest drop in over a month, down 2%. that has some wondering if the summer rally's over or just taking a breather. >> jeff: today's selling started in asia and spread around the globe, despite japan's emergence from recession. global markets strategist stu schweitzer joins us for a look at the big picture. >> just to be on the safe side we decided not to kill any engines or shred any cars until the government funds the program. and pays for it. >> paul: sam mansouri's among thousands of car dealers waiting on a "cash for clunkers" payday and wondering what's next for the industry. >> jeff: then, shares of lowe's get nailed, falling 10% as the home improvement retailer's latest earnings miss the mark. and it pulls back on expansion plans. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> jeff: and i'm jeff yastine. susie gharib is off tonight. this is "nightly business report" for monday, august 17. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pb
. >> you have to be really smart about how you use your money nowadays, so coming here, it's a better way to save money. >> suzanne: that's jennifer, and value is why she and millions of other freshman are staying close to home for college this fall. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> suzanne: and i'm suzanne pratt. susie gharib is off tonight. this is "nightly business report" for thursday, august 13. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suzanne: good evening, everyone. today is the deadline for seven large companies to submit their executive compensation plans to the obama administration's pay czar. tomorrow, kenneth feinberg will begin reviewing the pay plans for the firms still on government life support, including citigroup and g.m. feinberg has 60 days to accept or reject the proposals. joining me now with his thoughts on the hot topic of executive compensation is charles elson. he is a professor at the university of delaware and director of the weinberg center for corporate
captning sponsored by wpbt paul: u.s. stocks take it o the chin with the dow posting its biggest drop in ov a month, down 2% at has some wondering if the summerally's over or just taking a breather. >> jeff:oday's selling started in asia and spread arounthe globe, despi japan's emergence from recession. glal markets strategist stu schweitzer joins us r a look at the b picture. just to be on the safe sid we decided not tkill any engines shred any cars until the government funds the program. d pays for it. >> paul: sam mansouri'among thousands of car dealers waing on a "cash forlunkers" payday d wondering what's nexfor the industry >> jeff: then, shares of lows get nailed, faing 10% as the home impvement retailer's latest earnings miss the mar and it pulls bk on expansion pls. >> paul: i'm paul kaas. >> jeff: and'm jeff yastine. sie gharib is off tonight. this is "nightly busines report" for mond, august 17. "nightly business report" is made possib by: this program was me possible byontributions to your pbs station from viewe like you. thk you. >> jeff: good eveng, everyone. stoc
have already declared that the recession is over and that the u.s. economy is on the path of recovery. but as scott gurvey reports, even the experts have lots of questions about the central bank's next move. >> reporter: fed watchers would like answers to three questions when the central bank concludes its august meeting on wednesday. first, they want to know abo plans to raise interest rates. second, they want to know if the fed thinks the economic recovery is real. and finally, they want to know if chairman ben bernanke will be re-appointed to a second four- year term. well, answers to two out of three isn't bad. first up, there isn't a snowball's chance in a very warm place that the fed funds rate will be raised from its zero to .25% range this month, or, according to jim o'sullivan of u.b.s., anytime soon. >> most likely they'll repeat the language, indicating that the funds rate's going to stay exceptionally low for an extended period. in addition, we would expect the wording to be a bit more optimistic sounding on the outlook for growth. this is consistent with the idea that the
population growth, economistsigure the u.s. nee to create 130,000 jobs a month. in a recovy, the u.s. should create somhing like 300,000 to 400,00a month, enough to begin reducing unemployment significantly. that means t country won't recor the jobs lost to this ressiotier the year 24 at the earliest. economist an baker says it won't be easy to replace t jobsost because the recession has slammed housing and auto manufacturing, t sectors that usually ive the recovery in hiring. >> in the case of residentia constructionwe have enormous er-capacity. it's very difficult tomagine any significt increase in employment in that sectofor years to com in the case of autos, we canee increased dema, we probably will s increased demand, but a lot of that demand igoing to be for forgn cars right now. reporter: of course, the economy will entually create enough jobs to make up for tse lost in the grt recession. but those jobs maylso be in diffent industries and many of the spific jobs that went away, may never come back. darren gersh, "nhtly business rert", washington. >> paul: sellers took mmand on wall st
key interest rate unchanged at zero percent and signaled that the u.s. economy is beginning to recover. as suzanne pratt reports the decision was unanimous. >> reporter: the super low interest rates americans have been enjoying are likely to stay with us for a while longer. wrapping up its policy meeting, the federal reserve left the benchmark short-term rate close to zero percent, saying economic conditions warrant it. economist steve ricchuito says the fed is not telegraphing when it will raise rates, but he has his own guess. >> our personal bet is that we won't see any real movement on rates until we get to the second or third quarter of next year, and that's contingent on the economy really finding its feet and starting to be able to move sustainably forward. >> reporter: in assessing the economy, the fed said activity is leveling out, but likely to remain weak for a time. it also acknowledged financial market conditions have improved in recent weeks. policymakers also opted to slow the pace of purchases of long- term treasuries, extending the emergency rescue program by one month
, everyone. ben bernanke said today the prospects for economic growth in the u.s. appear to be "good," and those comments triggered a stock market rally. speaking at a conference in jackson hole, wyoming, the federal reserve chairman gave a more upbeat forecast compared to the fed's statement last week after a central bank policy meeting. but bernanke also warned of "critical challenges". specifically, bernanke said financial firms face "significant losses," businesses and consumers are experiencing difficulty in getting credit, the economic recovery will be "relatively slow," and he expects a gradual recovery in unemployment. bernanke defended the actions taken by the fed during the financial crisis, saying they averted an "imminent collapse" of the financial system. joining us now with more analysis, robert mcteer, former president of the federal reserve bank of dallas and currently distinguished fellow at the national center for policy analysis. nice to see you on the program again. >> thank you, susie, good to be with you. >> susie: is ben bernanke right about the economic outloo
the ministration says clunker uchers will be good for future purchases >> you he to be really smart out how you use your money nowadays, so coming here, it a better way to ve money. >> suzanne: th's jennifer, and value is w she and millions of her freshman are staying clo to home for collegthis fall. >> paul: i'm paul kang. >> suzan: and i'm suzanne pratt. susie ghar is off tonight. this is "nightly busins report" fothursday, august 13. "nightlyusiness report" is made possible by: this progr was made possible by contributions to yourbs statn from viewers like you. thank you. >> suzanne: go evening, everyo. toy is the deadline for seven lae companies to submit their executive compensation planso the obama admistration's pay ar. tomoow, kenneth feinberg will begin reviewing the pay plan for the rms still on government life suort, including tigroup and g.m. feinberg has 60 days taccept or reject e proposals. joining me now wh his thoughts on the hotopic of executive compensaon is charles elson. is a professor at the university of delaware and director of thweinberg center for corporate governance. lco
action" in rescuing the u.s. economy. bernanke's current term at the fed ends in january. his nomination still needs to be confirmed by congress. but today, the fed chairman promised to continue work to restore stability in the economy and the markets. >> we have been bold or deliberate as circumstances demanded but our objective remains constant, to restore a more stable financial and economic environment in which opportunity can again flourish and in which americans' hard work and creativity can receive their proper rewards. >> susie: joining us now with more on bernanke, laurence meyer, former fed governor and now vice chairman, macroeconomic advisers and david jones, c.e.o. of d.m.j. advisors and author of "unlocking the secrets of the fed". test. >> good evening. >> larry, let me begin with you. you support the bernanke renomination. tell us why. >> yes, unquestionably. the first issue you have to decide on, whether you think he deserves to be reappointed. that's a question of how good a job he's done as chairman. i believe he's done an exceptional job during extraordinary times. he
evening, everyone. an unwelcome surise for the u.s. ecomy today, as more americans filed for jobls benefits. the numberf claims jumped by 15,000 to a seasonal adjusted 576,000. mostconomists had expected a drop. the report raises questions about the econic outlook and thstrength of the recovery. >> susie: while thos employment claims rose last week, not every ouof-work person ieligible to receive benefits. as sphanie dhue explains, there are ny categories of who can and cannot get financial help. >> thank you. >> reporter:ut of work since june, james phillips is w watchingis sister's kids to lp make ends meet. after working for a churchor o years, he found he wasn't eligible f unemployment benefits, en though he had worked in thprivate sector for almost 2years. >> the last two years, chose to work for a church-- didn' painto it, now i don't have it when i need it t most, and that's kind of dappointing morehan anything. >> reporter: pllips is feverily hunting for a job. he's alscutting his budget, and dipping into savin. he's not alone. currently, 56% of thjobless arnot collecting o
growth in the u.s. appr to be "good," and those comments triggered stock market ral. speaking at a conference i jackson ho, wyoming, the federareserve chairman gave a more upbeat forecast compad to the fed'statement last week after a central bank polic meetg. but bernankelso warned of "ctical challenges". specifically, bernankeaid financial firms face "significant losses,businesses and coumers are experiencing difficulty in geing credit, the economic recovery will b "relatively slow," ande expects gradual recovery in employment. bernanke defended the actis takeby the fed during the financial cris, saying they averd an "imminent collapse" of the financial sysm. joining us nowith more analysisrobert mcteer, former present of the federal reserve bank of dall and currently distinguished fellow at e tional center for policy analysis. nice to see you the program agai >> thank you, susie, good to be with you. >> susie: is ben bernanke right about the economic outlook? >> well, i hope so. and probabl i thk there's a good chance we'll get a positive g.d. number for the current quarter
consistent with the idea at the economy is improving slowly. which brings us tohe second answer: bo traders are antipating higher rates as soon as the fourthuarter. but bob bruscaf fact and opinion economics says we wi not read that e fed believes the crisiss over. >> once the fed go for business as ual, then it needs to start takg out the excess reserves, getting tes back up into more neutral framework, d that's where i don't think we are y. as to thfinal question, the future of thchairman who has taken lot of political heat in recent months inashington. wall strt will get no information whatsoever ithe fed atement, and be left guessing as to his reappointnt chances. >> it's certainly being taed about, and i think ie seen polls this. and the vast majority of economists support bnanke being re-aointed, and i rtainly agree with that. >> the easiest decision th obama has is re-pointing rnanke. other decisis will expose him to much moreisk than he needs toeal with. and frankly, hs got enough toh decisions to wade into than this one, ts one is easy. >> reporter: it's ha to find anybody on wall
direction. joining us now to talk about that and his market outlook, art hogan, chief market analyst at jefferies and company. >> hi, right a.>> hi. >> what's your take on insider selling? is this a sign that investors should lighten up a bit? >> it's interesting. we take that as a signal, and if you bow did back in history and look at the market timing, insider sales, it doesn't correlate very well. what it does tell us, though. is for the first time in a period of time there's a lot of insiders that feel they've gotten to a point where they're not underwater, not underwater on share prices, meaning a lot of insiders get their stock because of compensation. you know, imagine, if you will, you received stock as compensation at $20, goes to $10, now it's at $22, and up the to make a sale because you don't want to it go back to $10. that doesn't mean it will go to $10 or $25. typically the market senses a negative signal. it's something to keep an eye on. >> susie: over time, so many studies have been done, the trends in insider selling mimics what's going to happen. in march, insiders
. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. this is nightly business report for use it, august 11th. this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. 7//& captioning sponsored by wpbt >> susie: hazardous to the economy's health. that was the warning today from the congressional watchdog monitoring the government's bailout of the nation's banks. according to a report from the congressional oversight panel, banks still have plenty of problem loans on the books and that could threaten the economic recovery. how bad is this situation? stephanie dew talked today with the panel's chairwoman, elizabeth warren. >> how vulnerable is the financial system to the toxic assets? >> what's vulnerable -- it's vulnerable in two ways, first, most of the toxic acids -- assets that were there in october are still there with all the implications in terms of as they don't pay off, they run the risk of bringing the banks down. the second is so long as these assets remain on the bank's books, every time they get capital in, they use it as sort of a
are rightow. give us yournalysis? >> well, it's a very real possibility. because ofll the elemes that aret work rig now in the various markets, the recovery you s in the stock market n a way for right now it's good news for us al that oil pris are where they are because it is a real validation that economic activity is back in the calculus of everhing, rticularly in china and certainlin what we are seeing in europe. as you mentioned tay about the earlier in e show about the leading economic indicators, showing anoer posive reang today. all combining to help push these oil pric up. >>s it real demand, joh because we aays here about --ear about speculations in the market, manipulation in the l market is thiseal economic activity? it's a combinatioof real ecomic activity. it's also aombination dema -- inflation fears that are in this market that e beingdriven by budget and monetary policiesround the world. alsohe fallingdollar is driving this prospect as well. it's a coinationof that and constrained supply. sai arabia is chief among opec members in cplying with their qta by $110% so they real
of hidingheir assets and evading u.s. taxes. atne time, those accounts held more than $18 billn. a tentative deal waseached between u.s. and the i.r.s. last week. but e details weren't made public until now. irs commsioner doug shulman says the agreement sends a strong message to l americans, incling tax chts. >>e will use all of the enforcement tools at our disposal to pursueou. for honest hard workineveryday american school teachers, firemen policemen who patheir taxes. the message is alsthere. wealthy ople can't skirt the rules and hide assets. we a going to insure that everyone pays their fairhare of taxes. >> susie: eaking of fair shareslate this afternoon, the swiss government annoued its selling itstake in u.b.s. thswiss hope to recoup more th $5.5 billion on that sale. and anges are coming tomorrow for american consume. thanks to the credit caract of 2009, a neset of rules goes into effect. includin the ability to reject rate increases. but as jeff yastinreports, it's alrdy having some untended consequences. reporter: across the countr right now, therere thousands of pple just like k
. this is nitly business report for use it, august 11th. th program was made possible by contributns to your pbs station from viewers likyou. thank you. 7//& captioning sponsored bwpbt >> susie: hazardous to the econy's health. thatas the warning today from the congressional watchdog monitori the government's bailout of the tion's banks. according to report from the congressional oversht panel, banks still have plenty problem loans on thbooks and thatould threaten the economi recovery. how bais this situati? stephanie dew talked today with the panel' chairwoman, elizabeth rren. >> how vnerable is the financial stem to the toxic asse? >> what's vulnerable -- it's vulnerable in two waysfirst, mostf the toxic acids -- assets th were there in oober are still thereith all th implications terms of as they n't pay off, they run the risk ofringing the bank down the seconds so long as these assets remain onhe bank's books, every time they get capil in, they use it as sort of a hedge agnst those assets rather than turni around and lending that capital. so it gets in the way of small buness lending andth
" and "bold action" in rescuinthe u.s. economy. bernke's current term at the fed ends in january. his nonation still needs to be confirmed by congress. but today, the fed chairn promised to coinue work to reste stability in the economy and the markets. >> we ve been bold or deliberates circumstances demanded but our objecti remains constant, restore a more sble financial and economic environment in whh opportunity can again flouri and in which americanshard work and cativity can receive their proper rewards >> susie: joininus now with moren bernanke, laurence meye former fed governor and now vice chaman, macroeconomic advisers and david jones, c.o. of d.m.j. advirs and author of "unlocking theecrets of the fe. test. good evening. >>arry, let me begin with you. you support the bnanke renomination. tell us why. >> yes, unquestionably. the fit issue you have to decide on, whether y thi he deserv to be reappointed. th's a question of how good a job 's done as chairman. i believe he's done an exceptional job dung extraordary tim. he's been aggressive and creave. and put in place a set of pocies th
, everyone. the gornment needs to stop spending money on the u.s. economy. that's the conclusion toy fr a new poll leading economists conducted by t nationalssociation of business ecomics. acrding to the rvey, 76% of those economists donot believa second stilus package is necessa. saying the economy is now beginning to recover. stead, they say the u.s. government should cut spending ov the next two years. scott gurvey has details. >> rorter: the economists poed were generally supporti of currentiscal and monetary policy. but guard about prospts for the fure. fo out of five say e governmenttimulus programs have add to g.d.p., but ree out of four don't believe a second stimulus package is needed. on economist think the current imulus package is enou. >> we've only aocated... we've allocateless than a third of it. th administration desned is thing to be a time-release caule. expecting that expeitures wod go onnto 2010 and continue to give som support to the economy. so ia way we ve a sond stimulus packagelready in the books. >> reporte whether or not it is needed, oneconomist believes more stim
de in response to the recession are likely to continue. >> i used to spe ridiculous amounts ofoney on going out to eat and shopping, and whnot. and because of evething that's haened, it's not jt myself, even for my friends with js, it's been very soberin >> reporter: the unexpecd decline inhe unemployment rate is being taken with a bigrain of salt many economists. a lot of job seekers gavup their search in ju, and the jobless rate cou tick up again if they resume looki for work. scott gurvey"nightly business report," new york. >> jeff: wel just the hint of slowing job losses had theulls roaring and short seller yelling r mercy. the dow popped 160 pointhigher in the fir 90 minutes of trading. consum-related stocks, like american expss, disney and home depot, were favores on the day. bothhe dow and nasdaq surged inhe early afternoon, but some traders cashing out ahead ofhe ekend trimmed the ins.ga the dow still finished up 1181 ints at 9370.07. this week, it fell twice a rose three times for an erall gain of 198.46 points. the nasdaq gaid 27 points to 2000.25. it also rose in ree ou
in the deposit insurance fund, the f.d.i.c. expects $32 billion will be used for losses regulators already see coming. that leaves a little more than $10 billion to cover the unexpected. and with 416 banks on the f.d.i.c.'s problem list holding assets of $300 billion, there is plenty of room for unexpected. >> they're going to need more money. >> reporter: doug elliott studies the financial crisis for the brookings institution. if needed, the fdic can borrow from the treasury to shore up it's deposit insurance fund, but elliott thinks taxpayers won't have to any losses. >> my best guess is that taxpayers won't have to put up anything. that the premiums they can charge to the banks over the next, say ten years, can cover this crisis. but we don't know. >> reporter: james chessen, chief economist, for the american bankers association says banks are doing their part to help the fdic. they are already paying higher premiums for deposit insurance and the industry set aside $67 billion in the second quarter to cover their growing loan losses. >> it's a matter of trying to be prudent having income a
. the government needs to stop spending money on the u.s. economy. that's the conclusion today from a new poll of leading economists conducted by the national association of business economics. according to the survey, 76% of those economists do not believe a second stimulus package is necessary. saying the economy is now beginning to recover. instead, they say the u.s. government should cut spending over the next two years. scott gurvey has details. >> reporter: the economists polled were generally supportive of current fiscal and monetary policy. but guarded about prospects for the future. four out of five say the government stimulus programs have added to g.d.p., but three out of four don't believe a second stimulus package is needed. one economist thinks the current stimulus package is enough. >> we've only allocated... we've allocated less than a third of it. the administration designed this thing to be a time-release capsule. expecting that expenditures would go on into 2010 and continue to give some support to the economy. so in a way we have a second stimulus package already in the boo
.com tells us why kraft foods has landed on his bargain basement radar. >> jeff: then, remembering the liberal lion. we look at how the late senator ted kennedy shaped health care reform and what happens to those efforts now. >> paul: i'm paul kangas. >> jeff: and i'm jeff yastine. susie gharib is on assignment. this is "nightly business report" for wednesday, august 26. "nightly business report" is made possible by: this program was made possible by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> jeff: good evening, everyone. a much bigger increase than forecast. sales of new homes jumped 9.6% in july. could it be the housing market is turning? scott gurvey reports. >> reporter: it was the fourth straight month of increased new home sales and although this is a number with a wide margin of error, it did encourage those who see a bottom in housing. beth ann bovino of standard and poor's notes there has also been increased buying of distressed properties and existing homes. >> those homeowners were actually free to move and actually buy something elsewhere. so
: the barga hunter return street critique guest trick o'hare obriefing.com tells us y kraft foods has land on his bargain basement rar. >> jeff: the remembering the liberal li. look at how the late senato ted kennedy shapedealth care reform and what happens to tse efforts now. >> pl: i'm paul kangas. >> jeff: and i'meff yastine. susie gharib is assignment. th is "nightly business report" for wednesda august 26. "nightly business rert" is made ssible by: this progr was made possible by contributions to yourbs station from viewers le you. thank you. >> jeff: good evening,veryone. a much bigger increase tn forecast. les of new homes jumped 9.6% in july. coulit be the housing market is turning? scott gurvey rorts. >> reporter: it was the urth straight month of increasenew ho sales and although this is a number with a wide mgin of error, it did encoure those who see a bottom in hoing. beth ann bovino of staard and poor notes there has also been increased ying of distressed properties and exiing homes. >> those homeowners we actually free to move and acally buy something sewhere. so you're star
is often seen as an indicator market direction joining us now to talk about thatnd his market outlook, art hogan, cef market analyst at jefries and company. >> hi,ight a.>> hi. >>hat's your take on insider selling? is this a sign that investors shouldighten up a bit? >> it's interesting. take that as a signal, and if you bow did back in history and lo at the market ming, insider sales, i doest correlate ry well. at it does tell us, though. is for the first te in a peri of time there's a lot of siders that feel they've gotten to a pnt where they're not underwater, not underwar onshare pces, meaning aot of insiders get their stoc because of compensatn. you know, igine, if you will, you receive stock as compensati at $20, goes to $10, now it's at $22, and up the to make a le because you don't want to it go back to $10. that doe't mean it will go to 0 or $25. typically the market senses negative signa it's somethingoeep anye on. >> susie: er te, so many studies ve been done, the trends in inder selling mimics what's going to happen. in mch,insiders started buying up, tt was the beginning of th
: the fate of health care reform may rest in the hands of six u.s. senators. three republicans and three democrats. they've been negotiating for over a month now. to find out what they are talking about, darren gersh spoke with iowa republican charles grassley, a key member of the group. darren asked grassley how much progress the group has made. >> a lot of noncontroversial things that i suppose that you could say there's been a lot of accomplishment on over even far back. but there's always a large share of the issues that are not only complex, but also controversial and there's still a lot of those left to do. >> reporter:? democratic leaders said the bipartisan group should deliver a healthcare plan by september 15th. what do you think of the deadline? >> well, if the majority party made a decision that that's what they were going to do regardless, they could enforce it and do it. but i've always been an advocate for let's do it right. and several reasons for saying "let's do it right." one of them is, you know, healthcare is one-sixth of our economy. when you are restruck you aring
anywhere in the screen. a libraries folder takes a little getting used to but is effective in combining your work, even if it is stored on different computers in a network. but the biggest news is under the covers, "windows seven" is more stable, faster and smaller than vista. it ran well on my old laptop, which couldn't handle vista. pcmag.com's lance ulanoff agrees with my review and notes this time, microsoft has played down the hype. >> basically they're saying this is an operating system that works. it gets the job done. it's going to be learner. it's going to work on the hardware that you currently have. you won't necessarily have to upgrade to run it. i think they're going to right the windows ship with this operating system. >> reporter: so the verdict: if you're buying a new computer, yes, get "windows 7." in fact, that's the best way to do it. if you are already running vista, yes. the upgrade is virtually painless and you will be pleased you did it. still running xp, now it gets interesting. the answer is, maybe. a lot of people, including a lot of companies, skipped vista. i
-spent. >> it would be more costly to the economy for us not to take care of those working families than it would be to invest in this benefit extension. and in fact, over time, this pays itself back. >> reporter: not everyone agrees. douglas holmes represents the business community, which is now struggling to pay benefits to workers. he says the extension could cost taxpayers as much as $70 billion. >> we need to sort of ratchet into a different gear and look at what we should be doing for the long-term unemployed, and not just paying additional weeks of unemployment insurance compensation. >> reporter: but for boteler, government money for unemployment insurance is a question of fairness. >> what about all the money they spent on the bailouts? that's costing the government a lot more money. >> this is what really keeps the people going. this is the thing, this makes a difference. >> reporter: congress is now considering a 13 week extension of benefits, but only in states with high jobless rates. with the national rate expected to keep rising, advocates for the unemployed say that's not enough.
", washington. >> susie: joining us now with more analysis, richard bove, veteran banking analyst at rochdale securities. >> suzanne: let's get right to the $3 million settle -- $33 settle., should it have been more? >> i don't think it should have been more. i don't think the government should tell a company to do something then fine them after they do it. but $33 million is very small relative to the $5.8 billion in bonuses that were paid. i'd say just a slap on the wrist. it wasn't a meaningful statement by the government. >> shareholders have been very angry about this whole b of a/merrill lynch merger, should they be satisfied been this news? >> you can't be satisfied if the sec fines your company. but i think they have to feel some degree of relief that there ll be no further activity related to this situation. that it will not hurt their stock price, will not hurt their company. they can move on and forget this for the moment. >> do you think new york attorney general will move on, they have been grilling bank of america overall of these developments for months now. is it over? is thi
ever been. darren gersh"nightly business report", washington. >> susiejoining us now with more analysis, richard bov veteran banking analyst rochdale securits. >>uzanne: let's get right to the $3 million settle -- $33 settle., shod it have been mo? >> i don't thi it should have en more. i don't ink the government should tell a companyo do something en fine them after they do it. but $33 million is very small relative to the $5.8illion in bonusthat were paid. i'd say just a slap on the wrist. it wasn't meaningful stement byhe government. >> shareholders have beenery angry about this whole b of a/merrill lynch merger, suld th be satisfied been is news? >>ou can't besatisfied if the sec fis your company but i ink they haveo feel some degree of relief th there will be no further activy related to this situatn. that it wil not ht their stock price, will not hurt their company. they can move on andorget this for the moment. >> do you think new yor attorney generalill move on, they have been grilling nk of america overall of these devepments for months now. is it over? is thi chapter over? >>
Search Results 0 to 48 of about 49 (some duplicates have been removed)